Wednesday, April 16, 2014

SIG 516

The family of SIG 516 Tactical rifles is a most recent product of the US-based branch of the international arms maker SIG-Sauer. Intended primarily for the US markets, this family of weapons included two basic semi-automatic versions, intended for civilian and Law Enforcement markets. The same family also includes selective-fired "assault rifles", strictly intended for Government (LE and Military) use. The SIG 516 Tactical rifles are closely patterned after the Ar-15 / M16 family of rifles, but with certain improvements, such as piston-operated gas action with adjustable gas regulator. It is possible that select-fire version of the SIG 516 rifle will also compete for replacement of the current US Army's M4 carbine.

SIG 516 Patrol rifle

The SIG 516 Tactical rifles are gas operated weapons that use Ar-15 / M16 configuration, with aluminum alloy upper and lower receivers assembled by two captive cross-pins. The basic Ar-15 / M16-style rotary bolt gas operated action is improved with addition of the short-stroke gas piston that runs inside handguards, above the barrel. The gas block is equipped with manually adjustable gas regulator. The trigger unit, manual safety and feed system (magazines, bolt release etc) are also similar to the Ar-15 / M16. The SIG 516 Patrol rifles feature shorter 16 inch barrels and adjustable M4-type buttstocks. The SIG 516 Precision Marksman rifles have longer 18-inch barrels and adjustable 'sniper' stock. In either version, barrels are chrome-lined. The sighting equipments is installed using integral Picatinny rail on the top of the receiver and on the additional 4 rails on the forend.

SIG 516 Precision Marksman rifle
SIG 516 Patrol Sig 516 Precision Marksman
Caliber: 5.56x45 NATO / .223 Remington
Action Gas operated, short stroke piston, rotary bolt locking
Overall length 920 ... 947 mm 914 ... 1003 mm
Barrel length 406 mm / 16" 457 mm / 18"
Weight, less magazine 3.3 kg 3.5 kg
Rate of fire (for MIL / LE versions only) 750 - 900 rounds per minute n/a
Magazine capacity 30 rounds
 

Monday, April 7, 2014

Barnett Ghost 410 Crossbow

Hailed for being a game changer and both breaking and setting records with its long anticipated release, the Barnett Ghost 410 CRT follows Barnett’s tradition of making each new iteration of their crossbow lines lighter, stronger, and faster than the one before.

The Ghost 410 improves on its predecessor the Ghost 400 by introducing Barnett’s CRT or Carbon Riser Technology in order to lighten up the crossbow by an impressive 43% dropping it to a comfortable 7.3 pounds as well as making it stronger and more compact. Keep in mind that the Ghost 410 is not for the hunter on a budget and in this review I’ll give you some information to help you determine whether or not it is the right crossbow for you given its price tag.


A modern standard in crossbow construction the quad limb design allows for a large amount of energy to be applied to the string and subsequently to the bolt being fired. The Ghost 410 improves on this design further with composite lamination which improves the tensile strength as well as the power that the crossbow can produce.

Despite its high tech feel the Barnett Ghost 410 is actually surprisingly simple to put together, nearly all customers report a very quick, straightforward assembly process that has them out putting bolts down range in less than 20 minutes.

Barnett’s proprietary technology which both lighten and strengthen the Ghost 410 in addition to shifting the balance close to the users shoulder in order to improve stability, accuracy, and comfort.

Two seemingly small features that have a significant impact on both safety and accuracy, the pistol grip with finger guard provides a comfortable grip which has obvious benefits for shooting performance. The pass through foregrip allows the shooter to have a much more firm hold on the crossbow when compared to standard foregrip designs.

A very welcome compliment to the Ghost 410’s host of features and technology these strings utilize Barnett’s custom fiber blend that has been proven to handle very high draw weights as well as the rigors of serious hunting routines in addition to significantly quieting each crossbow shot. Another handy safety feature which improves the safety and longevity of the crossbow by engaging the safety whenever it is cocked and not allowing it to disengage until a bolt is correctly loaded. This

Despite its compact and lightweight design the Barnett Ghost 410 exhibits nearly unrivaled performance and will certainly satisfy even the pickiest of marksmen. As far accuracy goes the Ghost 410 seems to have no problems hitting anything under 60 yards with extreme consistency and several reports claim nail driving precision out to 80 yards.

Based on the specs listed above you can probably already tell that the Ghost 410 is an absolute powerhouse capable of taking down any legal game that you can get in your crosshairs, and as long as you’re sighted in you can be assured that your shot will hit fast and hard each and every time you pull the trigger.

Specifications
180 lb draw weight
149 foot pounds of energy
15.375″ Power Stroke
410 FPS
22 inch arrow length

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

SIG 716

The family of SIG 716 Tactical rifles is a most recent product of the US-based branch of the international arms maker SIG-Sauer. This family reflects current resurrection of the interest toward 7.62mm NATO / .308 Win weapons among US and other NATO troops, currently operating in Afghanistan and Iraq. It also targets to US domestic LE and civilian markets, as the SIG 716 family of rifles includes both Selective-fire (LE/Military only) and Semi-automatic (Civilian legal) guns. The SIG 716 Tactical rifles are closely patterned after the Ar-15 / M16 family of rifles, but are somehow bigger due to the bigger and more powerful caliber, and with certain improvements, such as piston-operated gas action with adjustable gas regulator. The SIG 716 Tactical rifles can be considered to be bigger brothers to the very similar family of SIG 516 tactical rifles, which are chambered for 5.56mm / .223 caliber ammunition. Obviously, it also will compete against such 7.62mm rifles as HK 417, FN SCAR/H Mk.17 and a variety of other 7.62mm Ar-15 / M16 knock-offs. The rifles shown here are prototypes, and it is believed that production rifles will begin to appear on US market not earlier than 2011.


The SIG 716 Tactical rifles are gas operated weapons that use Ar-15 / M16 configuration, with aluminum alloy upper and lower receivers assembled by two captive cross-pins. The basic Ar-15 / M16-style rotary bolt gas operated action is enlarged and strengthened to work with more powerful 7.62mm / .308 caliber ammo and improved with addition of the short-stroke gas piston that runs inside handguards, above the barrel. The gas block is equipped with manually adjustable gas regulator. The trigger unit, manual safety and feed system (magazines, bolt release etc) are also similar to the Ar-15 / M16. The SIG 716 Patrol rifles feature shorter 16 inch barrels and adjustable M4-type buttstocks. The SIG 516 Precision Sniper rifles have longer 20-inch heavy profile barrels and adjustable 'sniper' stock. In either version, barrels are chrome-lined. The sighting equipments is installed using integral Picatinny rail on the top of the receiver and on the additional 4 rails on the forehand.


Military / LE only selective fire versions feature full-automatic and/or 3-round burst firing modes, civilian SIG 716 rifles will fire only in semi-automatic mode. SIG 716 rifles are compatible with current Armalite AR-10 Gen.2 magazines, which are available in 10- or 20-round capacities.

SIG 716 Patrol rifle with EOTech red-dot and back-up iron sights



SIG 716 Patrol Sig 716 Precision Sniper
Caliber: 7.62x51 NATO / .308 Winchester
Action Gas operated, short stroke piston, rotary bolt locking
Barrel length 406 mm / 16" 504 mm / 20"




Wednesday, March 19, 2014

FN SCAR Mark 16 & 17

The US Special Operations Command(US SOCOM) issued a solicitation for the procurement of SOF Combat Assault Rifles (SCAR)on October 15th, 2003. This solicitation requested a new combat rifle,specially tailored for the current and proposed future needs of the US Special Forces,which are somewhat different from latest generic US Army requirements,which are being fulfilled by the newest Heckler-KochXM8 assault rifle. The key difference in basic requirements between XM8 and SCAR is that, while XM8 is a single-caliber weapon system, tailored for 5.56x45mm NATO ammunition, the SCAR should be available in various different calibers.Initial SOF requirements included two basic versions of SCAR system - the SCAR Light (SCAR-L), available in 5.56mm NATO, and the SCAR Heavy (SCAR-H), which should be initially available in significantly more powerful 7.62x51 NATO chambering, and should be easily adaptable in the field to other chamberings. These other chamberings initially include the well-spread 7.62x39 M43 ammunition of the Soviet / Russian origins, and probably some others (like the proposed 6.8x43 Remington SPC cartridge, especially developed for US Special Forces). The key idea of SCAR rifle system is that it will provide the Special Forces operators with wide variety of options, from short-barreled 5.56mm SCAR-L CQC variation,tailored for urban close combat, and up to long range 7.62x51 SCAR-H Sniper variant, as well as 7.62x39 SCAR-H, which will accept "battlefield pickup" AK-47/AKM magazines with 7.62 M43 ammunition, available during the operations behind the enemy lines. Both SCAR-L and SCAR-H shall be initially available in three versions, Standard(S), Close Quarters Combat (CQC) and Sniper Variant(SV; now it is dubbed Long Barrel - LB). All these variants, regardless the caliber and exact configuration, will provide the operator with the same controls layout, same handling and maintenance procedures, and same optional equipment, such as sights,scopes, and other current and future attachments.

FN SCAR-H / Mk.17 rifle  prototype in CQC (Close Quarter Combat,short barrel) configuration,7.62x51 mm NATO version

Late in 2004 USSOCOM announced, that the winner for the initial SCAR contracts is the FN USA, an US-based subsidiary of the famous Belgian company Fabrique Nationale Herstal. Prototype rifles were manufactured by FN Manufacturing Inc, US-based subsidiary to FN Herstal; This company will also handle series production of rifles. Starting mid-2005, first SCAR rifles went to end users in US Special Operation Forces. Since USSOCOM uses Navy-type "mark" designations, SCAR rifles were officially designated as 5.56mm Rifle Mark 16 (SCAR-L / Light) and 7.62mm Rifle Mark 17 (SCAR-H/ Heavy). It is believed that Mk.16 and Mk.17 rifles will gradually replace most rifle systems now in service with US SOCOM forces, such as M4 carbines, M16 rifles, M14 rifles and Mk. 25 sniper rifles.

 FN SCAR-L / Mk.16rifle, 2nd generation prototype, with FN EGLM 40mm grenade launcher attached
 

As it turned out, FNSCAR rifles are not based on any previous weapons but designed from the scratch. In all variants FN SCAR rifles feature gas operated, short stroke piston action with rotating bolt locking. Bolt system appears to be somewhat similar to that of FN Minimi / M249 SAW machine gun. This system apparently is less sensitive to fine sand, dust and any other fouling inside the receiver, than any system with M16-type multi-lug bolt and plunger-type ejector.

FN SCAR-L / Mk.16 rifle partially disassembled; note additional quick-detachable barrel

Receiver is made from two parts, upper and lower, connected with two cross-pins. Upper part is made from extruded aluminium, lower part is made from polymer. SCAR-L and SCAR-H use similar upper receivers that differ only in the size of ejection port. Other different parts include caliber-specific bolt, barrel, and lower receiver with integral magazine housing. Parts commonality between SCAR-L and SCAR-H is astonishing 90%. Barrels are quick-detachable, and held in the upper receiver with two cross-bolts. Barrel change procedure requires minimum amount of tools, takes just several minutes and there is no need to adjust the headspace after the change.

5.56mm NATO FN SCAR-L / Mk.16 rifles of current (2007/2008) production, top to bottom in Long Barrel (LB), standard (Std) and Close Quarter Combat(CQC) configurations

The trigger unit with ambidextrous safety-fire mode selectors witch allows for single shots and full automatic fire, with no provisions for limited-length bursts mode. The charging handle could be easily installed on either side of the weapon, so the upper receiver has respective cuts on both sides. Top of the upper receiver is covered by the full-length integral Picatinny rail (MIL-STD 1913); additional Picatinny rails are mounted on both sides and under the free-floating handguards. Side-folding polymer buttstock is adjustable for length of pull, and is shaped to provide positive cheekrest with adjustable cheek support. SCAR rifles are fitted with removable, adjustable iron sights, with folding diopter-type rear sight on the receiver rail, and folding front sight onthe gas block. Any additional type of sighting equipment, necessary for current tasks, including telescope and night sights, can be installed using MIL-STD 1913 compatible mounts.

7.62mm NATO FN SCAR-H / Mk.17 rifles of current (2007/2008) production, top to bottom in Long Barrel (LB), standard (Std) and Close Quarter Combat(CQC) configurations

Mk.16 SCAR-L rifle will use improved M16-type magazines, made of steel; Mk.17 SCAR-H will use proprietary 20-round magazines in 7.62x51 NATO chambering, or standard AK-type magazines in proposed 7.62x39 M43 chambering. Current prototypes of SCAR rifles do not have bayonet mounts,and, probably, will never have one.

FN SCAR-L / Mk.16 rifle prototype (First generation, late 2004), left side view

  Mk.16SCAR-L (Light) Mk.17 SCAR-H (Heavy)
Caliber 5.56x45 NATO 7.62x51NATO basic
7.62x39 M43 and others additionally
Overall length, standard configuration 850 mm(max) / 620 mm (min) 997 mm (max) / 770 mm (min)
Barrel length 254mm/10" (CQC), 355mm/14" (Std), 457mm/18" (LB) 330mm/13"(CQC), 406mm/16" (Std), 508mm/20" (LB)
Weight 3.5kg empty 3.86 kg empty
Rate of fire 600rounds per minute 600 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity 30 rounds standard 20rounds (7.62x51 NATO)
30 rounds (7.62x39 M43)
 

Thursday, February 27, 2014

M-96 and XCR

American company Robinson Armament introduced its M-96 Expeditionary Rifle in late 1990s. It was basically a semi-automatic only modular weapon, patterned after famous Stoner 63 weapon system. It was available in several configurations. In 2002, Robinson Armament also introduced a military / police only RAV-02 rifle, which was based on same design but added selective-fire capability. Over that time,M-96 series rifles were no more than limited production items, sold mostly on civilian US market. Unlike original Stoner 63 design,no belt-fed versions were made in M-96 line.

Robinson Armaments M-96 rifle in standard configuration

In 2004, Robinson Armament unveiled a new design, which, while retaining basic modular concept, stepped out of Stoner pattern in several aspects. The new XCR rifle was submitted to SCAR special forces rifle trials, which were won by FNMk.16 and Mk.17 SCAR rifles. Since mid-2006, RobArm XCR rifles are sold on civilian US market in semi-automatic only versions; selective-fired versions are available only for government buyers.

Robinson Armaments M-96 rifle in top-feed ("Bren-type") configuration with short barrel

RobArm M-96 rifles were built on single,universal receiver, made from stamped steel. These receivers hosted quick-detachable barrels and basic gas-operated actions with long-stroke gas piston and rotary bolt locking. Receivers had mounting points for trigger units on "top" and "bottom" surfaces, and feed unit mounting points on "bottom" side only. In standard rifle configuration receiver is put with gas tube below the barrel, and magazine and trigger units mounted on the underside of weapon. In the "Bren-type" configuration, receiver is turned upside down so gas tube lies above the barrel, and magazine inserts from the top; the trigger unit is installed on the opposite, "bottom" side of weapon. Both trigger unit and magazine feed units also were made from stamped steel. Barrels with appropriate front sight mounts were used for every configuration, and rear sight block was attached to the mounting points on receiver, opposite to trigger unit. Guns were fitted with detachable, solid polymer stocks, and detachable plastic forends / handguards. In "standard" rifle and carbine configurations, charging handle was located at the left side of receiver, and ejection was to the right. In the"Bren-type" configurations, charging handle was on the right, and ejection was to the right (because the receiver was turned "upside down").

Robinson Armaments M-96 RAV-02 assault rifle (selective-fired), version chambered for 7.62x39 mm

RobArm XCR rifle is quite different from M-96. Most important, it abandoned the idea of single receiver with detachable units, that can be turned upside-down. XCR rifle reverted to the more common upper / lower receiver configuration, in which upper receiver hosts removable barrel, gas system, and basic action with rotary bolt locking. Gas system features traditional gas piston, and four-position gas regulator. Bolt has three locking lugs and locks into the barrel extension. Lower receiver hosts trigger unit and pistol grip, and has an integral magazine housing. Manual safety (which doubles as fire mode selector in "military" versions) is located on lower receiver, above the pistol grip, and can be located on left side only or both sides of receiver. Bolt catch release button is located at the rear of magazine veil, just ahead of trigger guard. Cocking handle is located at the left side of upper receiver, and can be used to assist the bolt closure.

Robinson Armaments XCR rifle, caliber 5.56x45 mm, with open sights (detachable and folding).

XCR rifles are fitted with side-folding skeleton buttstock. Top of receiver is shaped into integral Picatinny type accessory rail, with three additional rails located around the barrel at 3, 6, and 9 o'clock positions. For more convenient use, these rails can be covered with special polymer panels, that form rifle's forend / handguard. There are no standard sighting equipment "as is", but any compatible open or telescopic and night sights can be installed using Picatinny rail.

Robinson Armaments XCR rifle, caliber 5.56x45 mm

Robinson Armaments XCR rifle, caliber 6.8x43 mm Remington SPC, with Trijicon ACOG telescope sight

Caliber: 5.56x45 NATO; also 6.8x43 Remington SPC and 7.62x39 M43
Action: Gas operated, rotating bolt
Overall length: 959 mm (stock open), 696 mm (stock folded)
Barrel length: 407 mm (other lengths available)
Weight: 3.4 kg
Rate of fire: n/a
Magazine capacity: 30 rounds


Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Colt CAR-15 Commando

The first carbine version of the M16 assault rifle appeared under the name of CAR-15 in 1965, an was intended for US Special Forces who fought in Vietnam. The original M16 was simply shortened by cutting the half of the length of the barrel (from original 20 inches to 10 inches) and by shortening the buttstock by another 3 inches. The butt was plastic and retractable, the handguards were of triangular shape and the flash hider was of original three-prong type. Based on the original CAR-15, Colt quickly developed the CAR-15 Air Force Survival Rifle, intended, as a name implied, to serve to downed airplane and helicopter pilots. This version had tubular handguards and metallic tubular buttstock, and for some reasons the pistol grip was shortened.

Colt CAR-15 - earliest version

Initial combat experience with CAR-15 brought up some problems. First, the carbine was too loud, deafening the firing soldier quite quickly. Second, the muzzle flash was also terrific, blinding the shooter at night and giving away the position of the shooter to the enemies. Colt partially solved this problem by installing a new, longer flash suppressor. This version, known as the Colt model 609 Commando, also carried new handguards of tubular shape. This model was officially adopted by US Army as XM-177E1. This version had M16A1-style receiver with forward assist button. In the mid-1967 Colt slightly upgraded the Commando by lengthening the barrel up to 11.5 inches (292 mm), and this version was adopted as XM-177E2.

Colt Commando (model 733, note M16A2-style brass deflector and forward assist)

Later, with the introduction of the M16A2 and M16A3 (flat-top) models, Colt also changed the design of itys Commando line, adding three-burst options and flat-top receivers with Weaver-style rails.

Current Colt Commando carbines (Colt still called these Submachine-guns) are based on either M16A2 or M16A3 receivers, and had 11.5 inch (292 mm) barrels with M16A2-style flash suppressors, and available in either 3-round bursts or full-auto versions. Colt Commando carbines are used by various US Special Forces and by some foreign forces, including Israeli ISAYERET.

Colt XM-177E1

From the technical point of view, the Colt Commando is similar to contemporary M16 rifle, having same light alloy, two parts receiver, direct gas operated, rotating bolt action, with non-reciprocating charging handle at the rear of the receiver. The telescoping buttstock is made from metallic tube. Due to recoil spring, located inside the butt, the Commando cannot be equipped with side- or underfolding stock without some redesigning. Currently Colt Commando assault carbines are issued with standard M16-type 30 round magazines, but any other M16-compatible magazine can be used, including the 100-rounds Beta-C dual drums.

Caliber: 5.56x45 mm (.223 Remington)
Action: Gas operated, rotating bolt
Overall length: 680 - 762 mm
Barrel length: 292 mm
Weight: 2.44 kg empty
Rate of fire: 750 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity: 30 rounds (or any other M16 type magazine)


Wednesday, February 12, 2014

MILAN ER

MILAN ER (extended response) is a new generation man-portable anti-tank weapon system manufactured by MBDA for the French and Indian armies. It is an extended range variant of the combat-proven MILAN anti-tank missile system which is in service in more than 40 countries.

The Milan ER can be deployed to provide tactical fire support for land combat forces in close combat operations in urban and open terrains.

MILAN ER missile system development

MBDA and Bharat Dynamics signed a memorandum of understanding at Aero India exhibition in Bangalore, India, in February 2005, for the development and production of the MILAN ER.

Initial test of the complete system with ADT (Advanced Technology) firing post and ER missile was performed in October 2006 in Bourges. The system was qualified by the French DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement) in January 2007.

A successful series of evaluation trials was completed in March 2007. A series of three industrial test firings of the system were conducted at the DGA's Etablissement d'Expérimentation Technique de Bourges (ETBS) site in central France in April 2008. The three tests were conducted to verify arming distance to demonstrate accuracy over a range of 150m and to evaluate performance against a moving target at a range of 3km.

The MILAN ER missile system has been available for deliveries since 2011.


MILAN ER features

"The MILAN ER infantry weapon system provides reliable, accurate and flexible tactical operations."

The MILAN ER infantry weapon system provides reliable, accurate and flexible tactical operations. It can be effectively launched against fixed and stationary targets, such as heavily armoured tanks, command posts and fortifications.

The missile system is equipped with new extended response ammunition powered by enhanced propulsion system for high lethality, in-flight manoeuvrability, and maximum operating range. It can also be configured with the next generation technologies to meet the new combat requirements.

The improved anti-jamming capability of the system provides operators with continuous communication without any interference. The system can also be incorporated into future Network Centric Warfare (NCW) systems.


MILAN ER missile

The MILAN ER guided missile was produced by MBDA France. The first test firing was conducted in May 2006. Each missile weighs 13kg including tube, and can engage and destroy targets within the range of 3km.

The missile has an enhanced warhead, which consists of a new dual-mode tandem charge in the front to defeat early and new generation explosive reactive armour with optimal terminal effectiveness.

The warhead can penetrate 1m explosive reactive armour (ERA) or rolled homogenous armour, or over 3m of reinforced concrete.


Firing post

The MILAN ER is launched by MILAN ADT (advanced technology) digital firing post. The firing post supports built-in-test, maintenance, support and geo-positioning tools, and is fully digitalised.

The firing post weighs 34kg, including one MILAN ER missile, and incorporates an azimuth indicator and an integrated thermal imaging system with video inputs/outputs for remote operation and remote vision during all weather conditions. It is compatible with all types of MILAN missiles including the MILAN 2, 3 and ER variants.


WASP turret

The MLAN ER anti-tank missile system can be fired from armoured vehicle platforms using a modified WASP remote-controlled weapon station. The WASP turret can also be mounted with a 7.62mm machine gun. It offers protection for dismounted infantry or for logistic convoy escorts from enemy fire, and increases the responsiveness of the system.

The new turret was introduced by MBDA, Panhard General Defense and Sagem at the Paris International Air Show in 2009.

MILAN ER guidance system

The MILAN ER weapon system is equipped with semi-automatic command to line of sight (SACLOS) guidance system. The wire-guided SACLOS offers anti-jamming efficiency in clutter environments. The man-in-the-loop option further ensures accurate identification of targets and permanent control over the mission. It also prevents collateral damage in complex situations.

(Excerpts from: http://www.army-technology.com/projects/milan-er-extended-response-anti-tank-missile-system/)

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