Thursday, September 30, 2010

Uzi pro submachine gun




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Uzi Pro submachine gun


Caliber 9x19mm Luger / Parabellum
Weight 2,3 kg
Length (stock closed/open) 282 / 514 mm
Barrel length 134 mm
Rate of fire 1050 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity 25 rounds

The Uzi Pro is an evolution of the Micro-Uzi submachine gun. It retains same blowback operated, closed bolt, select-fire action but with side-mounted bolt handle, and the most important change is replacement of the older stamped steel trigger housing with more lightweight polymer pistol grip / trigger housing unit of more ergonomic shape. Top of receiver is provided with parmanently attached Picatinny rail, which is used to install various sights (i.e. Red Dot sights). Additional Picatinny rails are provided on the sides of the barrel and below it (the bottom rail is covered with ergonomically shaped protector when not in use). All firing controls are the same as with Micro-Uzi and include side-mounted safety / fire selector, automated grip safety (of improved shape) and magazine latch. Uzi Pro submachine gun uses same magazines as other weapons of the Uzi family, with 25-round ones being standard.

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Modern Sub Machine Carbine / MSMC submachine gun

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The Modern Sub Machine Carbine / MSMC submachine gun with optional Israeli-made ITL MARS red dot sight installed on the Picatinny rail.

Caliber 5.56x30 MINSAS
Weight 2.98 kg empty
Length (stock closed/open) 500 / 700 mm
Barrel length 300 mm
Rate of fire 700 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity 30 rounds

The Modern Sub Machine Carbine / MSMC submachine gun was born from the INSAS (Indian Small Arms System) program, which originally included three weapons - the 5.56mm INSAS assault rifle, the 5.56mm INSAS squad automatic / LMG, based on the rifle, and a compact carbine. The INSAS rifle and LMG are already in service with Indian armed forces, but the original INSAS carbine program faced several difficulties. As a result, it was decided to design a carbine around smaller round, based on the shortened 5.56mm cartridge. The new round appears to be of same concept that experimental American Colt MARS, as it has bottlenecked case 30mm long, loaded with light, pointed bullet with steel penetrator core. The bullet weight is 2.6 gram and muzzle velocity from 300mm carbine barrel is listed as 650 m/s, resulting in muzzle energy value of 550 Joules - similar to modern pistol cartridges. The cartridge, known as 5.56x30 MINSAS, offers effective range of about 200 to 300 meters, with good penetration against body armor. The early carbines for this round, known as MINSAS, were based on the INSAS rifle, lightened and scaled down for shortened round. The MSMC, however, derives from this by having more compact, pistol-type layout, which also offers better balance and better maneuverability, especially in confined spaces.

The Modern Sub Machine Carbine / MSMC submachine gun is intended for Indian Special Operation troops, but it also can make a good Personal Defense Weapon for vehicle and gun crews and other non-infantry personnel operating in combat zones. As of now (spring 2010), the Modern Sub Machine Carbine / MSMC submachine gun is in its final stages of T&E by Indian military.

The Modern Sub Machine Carbine / MSMC submachine gun is a gas operated weapon, utilizing rotary bolt locking and a gas piston, located above the barrel. The receiver appears to be made from sheet steel, with outer polymer housing with integral pistol grip. The magazines are inserted into the pistol grip. Buttstock is of telescoped type. Safety / fire mode selector is ambidextrous and conveniently located above the trigger. Standard iron sights are complemented by the Picatinny rail, which can host a wide array of additional day and night sighting equipment. Another unusual accessory for the Modern Sub Machine Carbine / MSMC submachine gun is the bayonet lug, which is located above the barrel, just in front of the receiver.

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

RShG-2 assault disposable grenade launcher / rocket-propelled grenade

Picture: RShG-2 rocket-propelled assault grenade (at the bottom the container is cut out to show the rocket and its warhead)


Caliber: 72.5 mm
Type: rocket
Overall length: 770 mm
Weight: 3.8 kg complete
Effective range: up to 115 m

The RShG-2 rocket-propelled assault grenade is a derivative of the RPG-26 anti-tank rocket grenade, with only differences being the warhead and re-graduated sights. Instead of the HEAT warhead as in RPG-26, the RShG-2 carries a Fuel-Air Explosive (thermobaric warhead in Russian nomenclature, as its primary kill effect is achieved by high temperature and blast pressure wave) warhead which is intended against soft skinned and lightly armored vehicles, buildings, military installations and enemy personnel in defilade or in the open. It was adopted by Russian army in around 2000, and is issued to Russian troops as an infantry support weapon, and also offered for export.

The RShG-2 is a disposable, single shot rocket launcher pre-loaded with fin-stabilized rocket. The single-piece smoothbore barrel / container is made of fiberglass. The rocket is contained in the barrel tube, and its solid-fuel motor burns out completely within the barrel. Because the barrel is open at the rear to avoid recoil, there is a dangerous backblast area behind the firing weapon. In transport/storage mode both ends of the barrel are closed by the front and rear covers, made of rubber; those covers shall not be removed manually and are destroyed during the rocket launch. Firing mechanism is cocked manually by rising the rear sight; lowering the rear sight de-cocks the firing mechanism so the grenade can be brought back to safe mode if the there's no immediate target. The rocket is fin-stabilized (with four switch-blade like fins at the rear), and its solid-propellant motor burns out completely while rocket is still in the barrel. The thermobaric / FAE warhead contains 1.16 kg of explosive fuel, which roughly equals in blast effect to 3 kg of TNT explosive. FAE blast radius is about 1 meter.

Sunday, September 26, 2010

MP 3008 submachine gun




MP 3008 submachine gun, version with skeletonized butt


MP 3008 submachine gun, version with tubular butt

Caliber: 9x19mm Luger / Parabellum
Weight: 2.95 kg empty
Length (stock closed/open): 794 mm
Barrel length: 200 mm
Rate of fire: 500 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity: 32 rounds

MP 3008 submachine gun was developed and manufactured in Germany during final stages of the World War 2. It is also known as "Volks Machinenpistole" (People's submachine gun), as it was produced as a last-ditch weapon to arm German Volkssturm units. Several German factories produced about 10 000 of MP 3008 submachine guns in several minor variations, with different stocks. All modifications were internally similar, being based on the British Sten Mk.II submachine gun.

The MP 3008 submachine gun is a simple blowback operated weapon that fires from open bolt. It was capable of semi-automatic and full-automatic fire, thanks to the Sten-type cross-bolt button type fire mode selector. The safety was made in the form of the L-shaped cut at the rear of the cocking handle slot, which was used to lock the bolt in rearward position. Unlike the prototype (Sten Mk.II) the magazine housing on the MP 3008 was welded below the tubular receiver. Ammunition was fed from 32-round box magazines, compatible with German MP40 submachine guns. The sights consisted of the front post and rear aperture, with fixed setting for 100 meters range. The MP 3008 submachine guns were manufactured withs several types of buttstocks, including metallic skeletonized or tubular butts, or simple wooden butts.

Saturday, September 25, 2010

53M / K1 submachine gun





53M / K1 submachine gun

Caliber: 7.62x25
Weight: 3.1 kg empty
Length (stock closed/open): 542 / 827 mm
Barrel length: 280 mm
Magazine capacity: 35 rounds

The 53M / K1 submachine gun was an indigenous weapon, designed during early 1950s by Hungarian designer Jozsef Kucher (hence the K1 index). It was officially adopted in 1953, and procured in limited numbers for police, border guard and certain paramilitary units in Hungary (the Hungarian armed forces adopted a license-built copy of Soviet PPSh-41 instead). The weapon appears to be of simple, robust and workmanlike design, and it s believed that it failed to achieve a more widespread success because of political, rather than technical matters.

The 53M / K1 submachine gun is a simple blowback weapon, firing from open bolt in semi-automatic or full automatic modes. The fire mode selector is located on the left side of the trigger housing, above the trigger. Safety is built into the bolt handle and locks the bolt in forward or rearward positions. Gun is mostly made from stampings; barrel is enclosed into perforated barrel jacket, and is equipped with muzzle brake - compensator. Metallic buttstock folds down and forward. The flip-up rear sight is L-shaped and has settings for 100 and 200 meters range.

Thursday, September 23, 2010

RMG multipurpose disposable grenade launcher / rocket-propelled grenade




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Picture 1: RMG rocket-propelled multipurpose grenade


Caliber: 105 mm
Type: rocket
Overall length: 1000 mm
Weight: 8.5 kg complete
Effective range: up to 130 m
Armour penetration: ~ 120 mm


The RMG rocket-propelled multipurpose grenade is a derivative of the RShG-1 assault rocket grenade. Its main purpose is to serve as a bunker-buster, to defeat enemy personnel behind light armor, walls and other protective means, as well as to destroy lightly armored vehicles and other military equipments. It was adopted by Russian army in 2001, and is issued to Russian troops as an infantry support weapon, and also offered for export.

The RMG is a disposable, single shot rocket launcher pre-loaded with fin-stabilized rocket. The single-piece smoothbore barrel / container is made of fiberglass. The rocket is contained in the barrel tube, and its solid-fuel motor burns out completely within the barrel. Because the barrel is open at the rear to avoid recoil, there is a dangerous backblast area behind the firing weapon. In transport/storage mode both ends of the barrel are closed by the front and rear covers, made of rubber; those covers shall not be removed manually and are destroyed during the rocket launch. Firing mechanism is cocked manually by rising the rear sight; lowering the rear sight de-cocks the firing mechanism so the grenade can be brought back to safe mode if the there's no immediate target. The rocket is fin-stabilized (with six switch-blade like fins at the rear), and its solid-propellant motor burns out completely while rocket is still in the barrel. The tandem warhead consists of a small-caliber leading HEAT warhead and a follow-through thermobaric / FAE (Fuel-Air Explosive) warhead, which explodes inside the target to achieve maximum damage effect.

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

RPO-A "Shmel" disposable thermobaric grenade launcher / rocket-propelled flame-thrower




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Picture 1: RPO-A rocket-propelled flame-thrower, in transport / storage configuration

Picture 2: RPO-A rocket-propelled flame-thrower, in ready to fire configuration, with FAE rocket shown next to it

Caliber: 93 mm
Overall length: 920 mm
Weight: 12 kg complete
Effective range: up to 200 m (1000m maximum)

Development of the singe-shot, disposable grenade launcher for Soviet army, which fired incendiary, thermobaric / FAE (Fuel-Air Explosive) or smoke rockets was initiated in 1984. The resulting weapon, known as "Schmel" (bumblebee) was adopted by Soviet army in 1988 in three versions - RPO-A with thermobaric / FAE warhead, RPO-Z with incendiary warhead and RPO-D with smoke warhead. Since the weapon is officially classified as flamethrower, per Soviet / Russian TOE it is used by Chemical troops (regardless of actual version), and usually is not issued to ordinary infantry. It is also in limited use by various Special Operations forces, including Russian Internal Affairs Ministry troops. The RPO-A version is considered as main in the whole line-up and is still in production for Russian army and export.

The RPO-A is a single-shot recoilless weapon of somewhat unusual construction. It has a fiberglass smoothbore barrel which is factory pre-loaded with a round of ammunition, which, in turn, consists of a missile with warhead and tail fins, and propelling charge. Upon firing, the propelling charge, which is loaded into separate case, is fired; it stays in the barrel while powder gases accelerate the missile; when missile has left the barrel, the propelling charge is expelled to the rear by the residual pressure, and falls to the ground at several meters behind the weapon. Obviously, this weapon creates a dangerous back-blast when fired. The basic controls include dual folding grips and rifle-type trigger with manual safety. Rear sight is of diopter type, with several apertures for different ranges. It is installed on the folding base; front sight is fixed. The missile is nothing more than a thin-walled container loaded with Fuel-Air Explosive (RPO-A), smoke composition (RPO-D) or Incendiary composition (RPO-Z), with four folding fins at the base. The blast effect of the thermobaric / FAE RPO-A warhead, which contains about 2.2 kg of Fuel-Air Explosive is roughly equivalent to the blast effect of the 107mm / 4" HE artillery shell. Upon explosion, RPO-A warhead generates the cloud of high-temperature flame (blast) which is about 6-7 meters in diameter (blast radius 3 meters or more). The blast cloud lasts as long as 0.4 seconds, thus allowing for significant incendiary effect in addition to the massive pressure wave (typical HE explosion lasts much shorter).

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Schwarzlose M1907 and M1907/12 machine gun




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Picture 1: Schwarzlose M1907 machine gun on Dutch-made M\25 tripod, with AA sight


Picture 2: Schwarzlose M1907/12 machine gun on standard Austrian tripod; spade grips are folded up

Picture 3: Schwarzlose M1907/12 machine gun on standard Austrian tripod; spade grips are in ready position, and a shoulder stock is attached

Picture 4: Schwarzlose M1907/24 (Vz.24) machine gun, interwar Czechoslovak conversion to 7.92x57 mauser caliber; note that it has longer barrel and jacket


Caliber
8x50R Mannlicher and others
Weight
20 kg (gun body) + 3 kg (water) + 20 kg (tripod)
Length
1067 mm
Barrel length
527 mm
Feed
belt
Rate of fire
400 rounds per minute

German arms designer Andreas Wilhelm Schwarzlose patented a basic design for a machine gun in 1902. He subsequently sold his patent rights to the Steyr arms factory in Austria, which produced the first guns of the Schwarzlose pattern in 1905. After two years of trials and development, the military forces of the Empire adopted the Schwarzlose machine gun in 1907; this gun was also later adopted in a range of calibers by the Netherlands and Sweden (who both manufactured Schwarzlose machine guns under licence until the 1930s), and by Greece, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria and Turkey – all before the World War I. In 1912 it was modified with the introduction of stronger parts and slightly reshaped retarding levers (struts). The primary visible difference between original M1907 guns and modified M1907/12 guns is the lack of the gap between the hump on the receiver and the barrel jacket on the latter guns.

After the WWI and the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, a great many Schwarzlose guns were adopted by smaller countries that emerged from the remains of the Empire, such as Czechoslovakia (which put the gun into production) and Hungary. Many Schwarzlose guns also went to Italy as war reparations, and subsequently saw some use during WW2, mostly in Africa in the original 8x50R caliber. Another user of Schwarzlose machine guns was Russia, which captured several thousands of Austrian machine guns during the early parts of World War One.

The Schwarzlose machine gun, although overshadowed by more famous weapons such as the Maxim or Browning, has its own merits. It is quite simple in construction, robust in service, and usually quite reliable. Its drawbacks come from its basic design, which centers on a retarded-blowback action. This action calls for a relatively short barrel so that the chamber pressure drops before the case begins to leave the chamber; otherwise it would rupture – although when the Czechoslovak army converted their old 8x50R Schwarzlose machine guns to the more powerful 7.92x57 Mauser ammunition, they had no problems associated with high pressure, even with new, significantly longer barrels. Nevertheless, most of the Schwarzlose guns retained short barrels throughout their service life. This obviously limited the muzzle velocity and thus the maximum range and possible bullet penetration at any given range, compared with contemporary guns with a locked breech. The short barrel also called for a dedicated flash hider, to suppress the significant muzzle flash which otherwise would blind the gunner at night. Finally, the lack of primary extraction required an integral oiler, which squirted a small amount of oil into the chamber just before chambering the next round. Nevertheless, the Schwarzlose was a good weapon and saw considerable use through both world wars, although during the Second World War it was mostly relegated to second-line troops, fortifications and other such uses.

The Schwarzlose machine gun is a retarded-blowback operated, water cooled, belt-fed weapon that fires from a closed bolt. The method of operation requires a heavy breechblock, connected to the receiver through a pair of knee-joint struts. When the bolt is in battery, the struts are folded forward, with their joint axis lying relatively low above the barrel axis. Upon firing, the pressure of the powder gases acts on the breechblock through the base of the cartridge case. The rearward movement of the breechblock unfolds the struts, but because of a carefully arranged redirection of forces through the struts and joints, most of the initial pressure is transferred to the receiver. Upon further recoil, joint axis rises above the barrel, and thus the recoil force is re-distributed with more and more of it being used for bolt acceleration. Upon recoil, the bolt compresses a massive and powerful return spring which forces it forward and into battery once the recoil stroke is completed. The charging handle is attached to the axis of the forward strut, and has to be rotated back to cycle the bolt.

Due to the lack of primary extraction, the Schwarzlose has to use oiled cartridges. To avoid the problems associated with factory-oiled or waxed ammunition (which tends to collect fine dust and then cause jams) the gun has an internal oiling system which squirts a small amount of oil into the chamber just before the chambering of each round. This system includes an oil reservoir, located in the receiver’s top cover, and a small oil pump, which is operated by the reciprocating bolt.

The belt feed system is very simple, and involves few parts. The major part is the star-wheel, located in the lower left corner of receiver. Upon bolt recoil, the star-wheel is rotated for one step by the interaction of the cam surfaces on the bolt and the wheel. Each cartridge has to make three steps in the feed before being presented to the bolt for chambering, therefore initial belt loading requires three deliberate pulls on the charging handle. The feed direction is from the right side only, ejection being to the left.

The trigger system also is of rather simply design. It involves a separate striker, a striker spring and a sear, mounted on the bolt. The sear is cocked by a lever attached to the rear bolt delaying strut, and this cocking movement adds to the retarding force applied to the bolt. After cocking the striker is held to the rear by the sear. The thumb trigger is located at the rear of the receiver, and once pushed by the operator, it holds the connection bar so it trips the sear when the bolt is in battery. A manual safety is located next to the trigger and blocks it unless pushed forward by the operator’s left thumb. Dual spade grips are located horizontally at either side of the receiver, and can be folded up for storage or transportation.

The most common mounting was a tripod of solid construction, with tubular legs of adjustable height and traverse and elevation mechanisms. An optional armored shield was available for this gun, which was unusual in that it also provided frontal and lateral armored protection for the thin metal of the water jacket. Alternatively, a low-height, lightweight tripod was provided for the “light” role. This tripod had no traverse and elevation mechanisms.

RPO-M / RPO PDM-A "Shmel-M" thermobaric grenade launcher / rocket-propelled flame-thrower




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RPO-M thermobaric grenade launcher / rocket-propelled flame-thrower, complete weapon (top) and FAE rocket (bottom)

Caliber: 90 mm
Overall length: 940 mm
Weight: 8.8 kg complete
Effective range: up to 300 m (1700 m maximum)


The RPO-M rocket-propelled flame-thrower is a recent development by the KBP Instrument Design Bureau, and is an improved version of the well-known RPO-A weapon, which was developed by same organization. RPO-M, also known as RPO PDM-A "Shmel-M", is adopted by Russian army and offered for export. It is significantly lighter than RPO-A, has better ergonomics and improved ballistics and terminal effect. It is also more accurate, thanks to the optical sight, integrated into the re-usable fire control unit.

The RPO-M consists of a disposable launching tube / barrel, pre-loaded at the factory with rocket, and a reusable firing control unit, which is attached to the launching tube before use. Once the rocket is fired, empty launcher tube is detached from firing control unit and discarded. The launcher tube is made from fiberglass, with protective rubber covers at both ends. Covers are destroyed automatically when rocket is fired. The firing control unit is made mostly from plastic, and consists of a pistol grip, electronic trigger (ignition electrical impulse is generated by the pull of the trigger) and manual safety mechanisms, and short forend. On the left side of the firing control module there's a folding base that hosts an optical sight, and an additional rail for attachment of an IR / Night sighting equipment. The rocket consists of an solid-propellant engine, folding tail fins and a large thermobaric warhead, loaded with Fuel-Air Explosive. The blast effect of the RPO-M warhead is said to be comparable with that of the 155mm / 6" HE artillery shell.

Monday, September 20, 2010

SA-2 Guideline




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The SA-2 was a potent air defense weapon in its prime, downing a USAF U-2 Spy Plane.

Designation: SA-2 Guideline
Classification Type: High-Altitude Surface-to-Air Missile System (SAM)
Contractor: State Factories - USSR
Country of Origin: Soviet Union
Initial Year of Service: 1957

The V-75 SA-2 GUIDELINE is a medium to high altitude surface-to-air missile system. This two-stage missile has a large solid propellant booster stage fitted with four very large delta fins. The core stage consists of a storable liquid propellant sustainer rocket motor using inhibited red fuming nitric acid oxidizer and kerosene fuel. A set of four cropped delta-shaped wings are located near the mid-section, with a second in-line set of smaller fixed fins at the nose, and a third in-line set of slightly larger powered control fins at the tail.

The original SA-2 Guideline design was engineered to track down and destroy the less-maneuverable high-altitude American bombers, more precisely - the Air Force's stalwart, the B-52 Stratofortress.

The guidance system at an SA-2 site can handle only one target at a time, but can direct three missiles against a target simultaneously. Additional missiles could be fired against the same target after one or more missiles of the first salvo had completed their run. The Soviets apparently believed they must program three or four missiles against each target in order to achieve acceptable kill probabilities.

The 295 kg nuclear warhead used only on the SA-2E variant is believed to have a yield of 15 kT. The other V-75 variants have an internally grooved fragmentation warhead weighs 195 kg (130 kg of which is high explosive) with proximity, contact and command fusing available. This conventional warhead is fitted forward of the main fins and behind the nose-mounted guidance assembly. At medium and low altitudes the kill radius is about 65 meters and the blast radius for severe damage is 100-120 meters. The maximum blast radius against a high altitude target is approximately 250 meters, due to the rarefied atmosphere. The weapon has a accuracy of 75 meters with the large blast radius compensating for system inaccuracies.

The first confirmed downing of an aircraft by the SA-2 system was of a Taiwanese reconnaissance aircraft of the RB-57 type, destroyed in 1959 over China. Successes continued to follow the system including the notable downing of Gary Power's U-2 Spy plane that reached the global headlines (more than one missile was actually launched and the aircraft was hit several times before going down). This single act resulted in a re-thinking of military and reconnaissance planning when dealing with high-altitude Soviet air defense systems.

During the Vietnam conflict with America, Soviet-supplied SA-2's to the North Vietnamese were responsible for aggressively targeting and destroying US Navy, Air Force and Marine aircraft. As a direct response, the United States was forced to develop counter-weapons systems to help combat the very serious SA-2 threat.

Despite advancements in Electronic CounterMeasure (ECM) systems and tactics, the SA-2 system still enjoyed relative success throughout the conflict and afterwards (some running through modernization programs to help extend the service life of the system). Never the less, the SA-2 Guideline would eventually begin giving way to the more advanced SA-10 series of surface-to-air missile systems.

Although there are a variety of arrangement patterns, all sites consist of six launching positions -- usually revetted - deployed around a guidance radar and linked by service roads to facilitate loading. While the sites were permanent installations, all operating components of the system are mounted on wheeled vehicles and are capable of movement by road or rail.

The capabilities of the Guideline system were highly valued, so much so that all other primary air defense systems (with the exception of those marking Moscow), were replaced by the newer SA-2's. By 1965, no fewer than 1,000 SA-2 Guideline launch sites had been established throughout the Soviet Empire and its satellite locations with a large contingent residing in the Soviet-controlled East Germany.

The V-75 was the basic missile defense system for critical urban-industrial areas in the USSR, other than Moscow. The V-75 deployment began on a wide scale since early 1958, with sites located throughout the western part of the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact countries. Deployment patterns and levels of concentration varied according to the geography, size, and shape of the target area, and the Soviet estimate of the worth of individual targets. Between mid-1958 and 1964 more than 600 SA-2 sites were identified by US intelligence in the USSR, mostly in defense of population centers, industrial complexes, and government control centers.

Most SA-2 sites defended major centers of population and industry. SA-2 defenses were also deployed for the special protection of nuclear materials production and storage facilities. In addition, some key Soviet field forces and long range bomber bases were included in the SA-2 deployment pattern. The construction of sites and the training and activation of firing units was seasonal, with activity at a minimum during the winter months.

The sites in the Moscow area, located within the inner ring of SA-1 sites, were intended to supplement the existing defenses. Deployment of SA-2 installations around Moscow included seven sites as of 1964 as part of a program to supplement the SA-1 system.

Variants:
SA-2 - NATO Reporting Designation
SA-2A - Featured with Fan Song-A radar system and utilizes either V-750 or V-750V missiles.
S-75 Dvina - Russian designation of the SA-2A model.
SA-N-2A - Naval Version
S-75M-2 Volkhov-M - Russian designation of the SA-N-2A model.
SA-2B - Features Fan Song-B radar system and utilizes V-750VK or V-750VN missiles.
S-75 Desna - Russian designation of the SA-2B model.
SA-2C - Features Fan Song-C radar system and utilizes V-750m missiles.
S-75M Volkhov - Russian designation of the SA-2C model.
SA-2D - Featured with Fan Song-E radar system and utilizes V-750SM missiles.
SA-2E - Featured with Fan Song-E radar system and utilizes V-750AK missiles.
SA-2F - Featured with Fan-Song-F radar system and utilizes V-750SM missiles.
C-75 - Russian Reporting Designation
HQ-1 - Chinese-produced Variant
HQ-2 - Chinese-produced Variant
HY-2 - Chinese-produced Variant of upgraded SA-2 base model.

Specifications:
Dimensions:
Length: 34.78ft (10.60m)
Width:1.64ft (0.50m)
Height: 0.00ft (0.00m)
Performance:
Speed: 1,864mph (3000km/h)
Range: 19miles (30km)

Structure:
Accommodation: Not Available
Weight: 2.5 US Short Tons (2,287kg)
Systems:
NBC Protection: None
Nightvision: None
Power:
Engine(s): 1 x two-stage solid-fuel booster with upper-stage liquid fuel.

Armament & Ammunition:

1 x 35ft, 5,041lb surface-to-air missile (various available warheads).

Targeting by radar system.

Ammunition:
1 x 35ft, 5,041lb surface-to-air missile (various available warheads).


Kiraly 39M 43M submachine gun





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39M submachine gun


43M submachine gun


Kiraly's patent for his delayed blowback action used in 39M and 43M submachine guns



39M43M
Caliber 9x25mm (9mm Mauser export)
Weight 4.15 kg3.7 kg
Length (stock closed/open) 1050 mm745 / 950 mm
Barrel length 500 mm425 mm
Rate of fire 750 rounds per minute650 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity 40 rounds40 rounds
Effective range 300-400 meters300 meters

The famous Hungarian arms designer Pal Kiraly developed his military-type 39M (39 Minta - model of [19]39) submachine gun at Hungarian Danuvia arms factory between 1937 and 1939. The 39M submachine gun bears more than passing resemblance to the Swiss-made SIG MKMS (M1934) submachine gun, which is not surprising, considering the fact that Kiraly worked in Switzerland at SIG factory during 1920s and 1930s, before returning to Hungary just prior to WW2. The 39M submachine gun represented a carbine-type weapon, being relatively large and heavy, so, in 1942-43 Kiraly also developed a more compact weapon along the same concept and delayed blowback action of his own design, known as 43M. Despite internal similarities and same caliber, the magazines of 39M and 43M were not interchangeable due to different feed angle on the 43M SMG. It must be noted that production of both submachine guns was somewhat limited, despite the fact that both were ranked among most powerful weapons in its class, thanks to long barrels and powerful 9x25 Mauser ammunition (muzzle velocity 450m/s, bullet weight 8.3 gram, muzzle energy 840 Joules)

The 39M submachine gun uses delayed blowback action designed by Pal Kiraly. In this system, bolt consists of two parts, with pivoting lever attached to the forward part (bolt head). When in battery, the bottom hand of the lever is resting against the receiver, and the upper rests against the rear part of the bolt (bolt body). Upon discharge, movement of the bolt head forces the lever to rotate back, thus speeding up the bolt body and slowing down the initial opening of the bolt head. Once the lever is fully pivoted, both parts of the bolt can recoil together freely against the return spring, to complete the firing and reloading cycle. Firing is from open bolt, in full automatic mode or single shots. Feed is from box magazines; magazine housing can be folded forward to save the space, with magazine resting inside the hollow stock, below the barrel. Stock is made of wood, the 43M submachine gun also having separate pistol grip and down-folding steel buttstock. sights are of open type, adjustable for range between 50 and 600 meters.

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Heckler - Koch HK MP7A1 submachine gun / personal defense weapon (PDW)




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HK MP7A1 submachine gun / personal defense weapon in standard configuration, with shoulder stock and foregrip in firing position, and with collimating sight installed on top rail



HK MP7A1 submachine gun / personal defense weapon with extended 40-round magazine and a number of extras, including night sight, flashlight and silencer

Caliber: 4.6x30mm HK
Weight: 1.5 kg empty
Length (stock closed/open): 340 / 540 mm
Barrel length: 180 mm
Rate of fire: 950 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity: 20 or 40 rounds
Effective range: 150-200 meters

The HK MP7 Personal Defense Weapon (PDW) is a member of a relatively new class of small arms, called Personal Defense Weapons (PDW; such specialized weapons are build since the start of WW2). The PDW are intended, as name implies, to be a defensive sidearm for second-line troops, vehicle crews and other military personnel who normally not issued with assault rifles. Previously, these troops were issued with pistols or submachine guns, but proliferation of body armor in recent years made those guns ineffective. The first firearm, intended as "the new age PDW" and offered in that class was Belgian-made FN P90, and it had special low-impulse, high-velocity ammunition, capable of penetration of current military body armor and helmets at ranges of 100 meters and beyond, while being much smaller and lighter, than assault rifle. The HK MP7, originally known simply as HK PDW, is another entry in the PDW class, and thus is a direct rival to FN P90.

The HK MP7, first announced in 2000, entered production in 2001 and, by early 2007, is officially adopted by German military, as well as some German special police units, such as KSK, and also offered for export sales. The British Military Police issues HK MP7A1 to its personnel since 2005, and it is believed that some South Korean special forces also use MP7A1.

The HK MP7 submachine gun / personal defense weapon has layout of a typical compact submachine gun (or a large pistol), with magazine being inserted into pistol grip, with folding forward grip and telescoped buttstock. The action of the MP7A1 is somewhat unusual for weapon of such small size, since it is gas operated, rotating bolt design, which strongly resembles the action of the HK G36 assault rifle, suitably scaled down. The ambidextrous fire mode selector/safety switch allows for semi-auto and full-auto modes. MP7A1 it designed to fire special, high velocity ammunition, 4.6x30mm, that looks like scaled down rifle round. That ammunition is unique to the MP7 and another HK weapon, the HK UCP / P46 pistol.

The receiver of MP7A1, along with integral pistol grip, is made from the polymer with steel reinforcements. Top side of the receiver hosts a Picatinny-type accessory rail for sight mountings. Standard sighting equipment is usually a set of low-profile open sights on quick-detachable mounts, plus a collimating (red-dot) sight Additional rails can be installed on either side of receiver, next to its front end.  The MP7A1 could be fired single-handedly, or using both hands, either like the pistol or using a front grip. Telescopic buttstock can be extended to give additional stability. With buttstock and front grip are collapsed, the MP7 can be carried like any big pistol in the special holster, and can be effectively used in close combat.

The 4.6x30mm ammunition is loaded with pointed all-steel bullets with brass jacket. Bullet weight is 1.6 gram (25 grains) and the muzzle velocity is 725 m/s (ca. 2400 fps). Manufacturer claims the 100% penetration of the CRISAT body armor (1.6mm of Titanium plus 20 layers of Kevlar) at the distance of 200 meters. Other types of ammunition, including tracer, frangible, spoon-tip (rapid-tumbling for use against unarmored human targets), blank and trill (inert) also available for MP7A1; ammunition is currently manufactured in UK by BAE Systems / Radway Green plant.

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Walther MPL and MPK submachine guns




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Walther MPL submachine gun, left side view, with buttstock folded


Walther MPL submachine gun, right side view, with buttstock in opened position


Walther MPK submachine gun

Walther MPL Walther MPK
Caliber 9x19 mm Luger 9x19 mm Luger
Weight unloaded 3.0 kg 2.83 kg
Length 746 / 462 mm659 / 381 mm
Barrel length 260 mm 173 mm
Rate of Fire 550 rounds/min550 rounds/min
Effective range 200 m 100 m
Magazine capacity 32 rounds 32 rounds

Walther MP series of submachine guns included two similar weapons which differed only in the length of the barrel - the Maschinen Pistole Lang (long submachine gun) or MPL in short, and Maschinen Pistole Kurz (short submachine gun) or MPK. Both weapons were developed during late 1950s and early 1960s, and mass production commenced in 1963. Walther submachine guns were adopted by several German police departments; some export sales also were recorded, the most notable purchase being by Mexican Navy. The sales, however, were not sufficient enough to warrant further production, and manufacture ob both versions has ceased in 1983.

Walther MPL and MPk submachine guns are blowback operated, selective fired weapons which fire from open bolt. The bolt is shaped like an inverted "L", with most of its mass being located above the barrel and in front of the breech face. The bolt rides on a single guide rod. The charging handle is a separate part which does not move when gun is fired. The receiver is made from steel stampings, with the trigger / magazine housing pivotally pinned to its base. The manual safety and fire mode selector are incorporated into one ambidextrous control, made in the form of lever, located on the grip behind the trigger. The shoulder stock is made from steel wire and folds to the right side of the gun.

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

UZI / Mini UZI / Micro UZI submachine gun




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Uzi submachine gun with metallic buttstock in opened position


Uzi submachine gun with metallic buttstock in folded position


Uzi submachine gun with fixed (detachable) wooden buttstock


Mini-Uzi submachine gun with shoulder stock folded



Mini-Uzi submachine gun with shoulder stock opened


Micro-Uzi submachine gun with shoulder stock opened


Micro-Uzi submachine gun with shoulder stock folded
 
UZI Mini UZI Micro UZI
Caliber 9x19mm Luger/Para 9x19mm Luger/Para 9x19mm Luger/Para
Weight, kg 3,7 2,7 1,5
Length, mm (stock closed / open)470 / 650 360 / 600 250 / 460
Barrel length, mm400 197 117
Rate of fire, rounds/min 600 950 1250
Magazine capacity, rounds25 , 32 20, 25, 3220
Effective range, meters200 100 30

The UZI submachine gun was developed in Israel by designer Uziel Gal in around 1949, and manufactured by IMI (now IWI Ltd) since about 1951. UZI had been adopted by police and military of more than 90 countries, including Israel (now only in reserve), Germany, Belgium. It was also produced under license in Belgium by FN Herstal, and without license - in Croatia. More compact versions, Mini and Micro UZI, which were developed in 1982 and 1983, respectively, are adopted by many police, special operations and security units around the world, including Israeli Isayeret, US Secret Service etc.

An interesting question is the ancestry of the design of Uzi submachine gun. Most sources state that it was inspired by the Czechoslovak SA 23 submachine gun, which also had magazine in pistol grip and wrap-around bolt. This submachine gun was adopted in 1948, with production commencing in 1949. There are some doubts that it could reach the shores of Israel the same year it was born. On the other hand, British army tested several prototype weapons of the same basic layout as early as 1944 (see MCEM-2), and it is possible that Uziel Gal had learned about this layout from UK. It is also possible that he "invented" this layout on his own - after all, the very same basic layout has been used in semi-automatic pistols for a good 50 years.

The UZI submachine gun is blowback operated weapon which fires from open bolt. Mini- and Micro-Uzi submachine guns are produced either in open-bolt or closed-bolt versions; in the latter variation, weapon is equipped with separate striker and additional spring. The receiver is made from stamped steel, with trigger unit and pistol grip pinned to its bottom at the center. The bolt is of "wrap-around" type, with most of its weight located in front of the breech face. The Micro-Uzi has an additional weight, made from tungsten, attached to the bolt, to slightly slow down the overly excessive rate of fire. The cocking handle is located at the top of the receiver cover, and does not move when gun is fired; the cocking handle slot is covered by sliding dust cover. Bolt handle is cut at the middle to provide a sighting channel. Gun is fitted with manual safety / fire selector, located on the left side of the grip, plus automatic grip safety at the rear. Full-size Uzi submachine guns were fitted either with a detachable wooden shoulder stock, or with underfolding metallic shoulder stock of indigenous design. More compact Mini-Uzi and Micro-Uzi are fitted with side-folding metallic buttstocks made from steel.

Monday, September 13, 2010

Heckler und Koch UMP




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HK UMP-45


HK UMP-40 with optional equipment: red-dot sight, tactical frontgrip and flashlight


HK UMP-9 (note curved magazine)

Caliber: .45ACP, .40SW and 9x19mm Luger/Para
Weight: 2.1 - 2.2 kg empty
Lenght (stock closed/open): 450 / 600 mm
Barrel lenght: 200 mm
Rate of fire: 600 - 700 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity: 10, 25, 30 rounds
Effective range: 100 meters

The UMP (Universal Machinen-Pistole = Universal Submachine Gun) had been developed by the Heckler & Koch company of Germany in the mid- to late- 1990s and first appeared on the markets in 1999. The key idea behind the UMP was to ceate lightweight and powerful submachine gun, that also will be cheaper than one of the J&K's flagships, the MP-5. UMP, being targeted primary for USA law enforcement market, first appeared in .45ACP and .40SW chamberings, and later - in 9mm.

The UMP is a blowback-operated select-fire submachine gun, being fired from the closed bolt. The receiver is made from the polymer, the controls are fully ambidextrous. UMP can be fired in full-auto, in single shots, and in 2 or 3 round bursts (optional). UMP also has bolt hold-open device, which traps the bolt in the open position when the last round from magazine had been fired. UMP has side-folding buttstock and two set of picatinny rails - one on the top of the receiver, and the other - on the forend. These rails can accept wide variety of sighting and other equipment, such as red-dot sights, laser pointers, tactical grips and flashlights. The barrel has quick mount for snap-on silencer.

Sunday, September 12, 2010

Heckler und Koch MP-5k




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HK MP-5K - original variant, with "S-E-F" trigger unit and the standard 30-rounds MP-5 magazine


HK MP-5KA4 - the most modern variant with ambidextrous, 4-position selector trigger unit and short, 15-rounds magazine


HK MP-5K-PDW - a "Personal Defense Weapon", with proprietary side-folding buttstock and a three-lug muzzle that can accept quick-detachable MP-5 silencers 


MP5K in the special carrying case


Caliber: 9x19mm Luger/Para
Weight: 2 kg without magazine
Length (stock closed/open): 325 mm
Barrel length: 115 mm
Rate of fire: 900 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity: 15 or 30 rounds
Effective range: about 25 meters

The MP-5K compact submachine gun (K stands for "Kurz" in German, that means "short") had been developed by the German company Heckler-Koch for various counter-terror and security units, that needed a short-range weapon with serious firepower. The HK MP-5K can be easily concealed under the clothes, in the glove compartment of a car, or in the special carry/fire suitcase. It also allows the high mobility in the confined spaces and in the crowd. The price for this features is the short effective range of fire, limited by the short barrel, short sighting line, and the lack of the buttstock. MP-5K is also manufactured under license in Turkey and Iran, and is widely used by various Law Enforcement and VIP protection units worldwide. In the mid-1990s HK developed a derivative of the basic MP-5K, called the HK MP-5K PDW, or Personal Defense Weapon. This weapon is intended for issue to military personnel, who usually is issued with the pistol. MP-5K PDW is much more compact than most of modern submachine guns yet it offers much more firepower than any military pistol. The most limiting factor to the popularity of the MP-5K PDW as the military sidearm is its very limited penetration against personal protection means, like the helmets and body armour. It may, by my opinion, seriously benefit from using the latest Russia-developed 9x19mm Armour Piercing ammunition, which is currently adopted by the Russian Army and the Internal Affairs Ministry of Russia.

Technically, the MP-5K is no more than a shortened HK MP-5 submachine gun, with no stock and with vertical front grip instead of the more conventional forend. MP-5K uses the similar stamped steel receiver and the same plastic detachable trigger units, available for standard MP-5. It also uses the same magazines. The sights on the MP-5K can be of the same pattern as on the MP-5 (hooded post front, drum adjustable diopter rear), or the low-profile non-adjustable fixed sights. The MP-5K PDW differs from the MP-5K by having a plastic side-folding stock (designed and made in the USA by the Choate Machine & Tool Co under the HK USA contract). The other visible difference is the three-lugged barrel, that can accept any silencers, compatible with the standard MP-5. All models of the MP-5K can be fitted with various laser sights and other accessories.

It is interesting to know that during the 1980s HK manufactured a semi-automatic only version of the MP-5K for the civilian market. It was called the SP-89, and visually differed from the MP-5K by the lack of the front grip. The SP-89 has been included in the US 1994 "Assault weapons ban" and is no longer imported to the USA, and, most probably, no longer made.

Saturday, September 11, 2010

Heckler und Koch MP-5




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HK MP-54, or HK 54 - a prototype submachine gun (1965). Earlier MP-5A1 adopted by German police and Border Guard looked the same. Note that the sights and the muzzle are different from the latter models. 


HK MP-5A2 with fixed stock and plastic S-E-F trigger group. 


HK MP-5A3 with retractable buttstock. Earlier model with checkered handguard and a stamped steel S-E-F (in fact, S-1-A) trigger group. 


HK MP-5SD3. A silenced version with integral silencer and retractable stock of A3 version. Early type stamped steel trigger group. 


HK MP-5N. Modern version developed for US Navy. Features plastic trigger group of latest design, with ambidextrous selector lever and "icon" markings. Barrel is threaded to accept US-made detachable silencers, in addition to HK standard three-lug mounts. Retractable buttstock of A3 configuration. 


Visual difference between trigger units:
left -earliest type stamped steel with plastic grip (converted from semi-auto only civilian gun HK 94, with American markings on selector);
middle - early type all-plastic with S-E-F markings;
right - most modern all-plastic design of "A4" variation, with additional 3-rounds burst facility and icon markings. 


HK MP-5 field-stripped. Note that both types of stocks are shown - fixed A2 type and retractable A3 type.
technical data (current models):
MP-5A2 MP-5A3
Caliber 9x19mm Parabellum (also .40S&W and 10mm Auto)
Weight, empty 2.54 kg 2.88 kg
Length 680 mm 490 / 660 mm
Barrel length 225 mm
Rate of fire 800 rounds per minute
Magazines 15 and 30 rounds
 
 The Heckler und Koch submachine gun, MP-5, is one of the most famous and wide-spread firearms of its class, developed since the Second World War. Its development began circa 1964 under the company designation HK MP-54, or simply HK 54. In the 1966, German police and Border Guard adopted the HK 54 as the MP-5, and it was originally available in two forms - MP-5 with fixed buttstock and MP-5A1 with retractable buttstock. Some years later HK slightly upgraded the design of MP-5, replacing the sights (from flip-up open notch rear and blade front to drum-type diopter rear and hooded post front) and the muzzle (replacing the two-slot muzzle compensator to the tree-lugs QD silencer mount without compensator). Other improvements made over the time concerned the magazines (early type magazines were of straight box type, latter - of curved box type for improved reliability). The trigger units also were upgraded - from original stamped steel with plastic grip to the all-plastic units, integral with grip, and with various fire modes and marking. Over the years MP-5 were adopted by the huge numbers of police, security and military forces around the world, including the German police and border guard, British police and elite Army SAS units, American police, FBI, Navy and Marine Corps, and many, many others. MP-5 is still manufactured in Germany by the HK itself, and also licensed to Greece, Iran, Pakistan and Mexico. The only real rival to the MP-5 in the terms of proliferation across the world is the famous Israeli UZI submachine gun. Most interestingly, the German Army (Bundeswehr) did not adopted the MP-5, most probably due to the economical reasons, and turned instead to the... UZI submachine guns, made under license in Belgium.

The success of the MP-5 is outstanding. It is based on the high quality and reliability of the gun, great single-shot accuracy (thanks to its closed bolt action), great flexibility and, of cause, good marketing. It seems that no other modern SMG at this time can rival the MP-5 in popularity (UZI is not manufactured anymore).

The MP-5, basically, is no more than the scaled-down version of the Heckler-Koch G3 battle rifle. It shares the same basic design with stamped steel receiver and the same roller-delayed blowback action, derived from the post-war CETME rifles. The trigger units are hinged to the receiver and are now available with various fire mode options,  including 2 (Safe, Semi-auto), 3 (Safe, Semi, Full Auto) or 4 (Safe, Semi, Limited burst of 2 or 3 rounds, Full auto) position levers, ambidextrous or not, and marked with letters, digits or icons. The MP-5 is always fired from closed bolt for improved accuracy, but this limits the amount of sustained fire due to the barrel overheating and resulting cook-off problems. To avoid this, MP-5 cocking handle could be locked in the rear position in the special slot, leaving the bolt in the open position, with no cartridge in the chamber. To commence the fire one must simply release the cocking handle from its notch and then pull the trigger. Modern MP-5 submachine guns are equipped with three-lug quick detachable silencer mounts on the barrel. Sights are similar to other HK models, and consists of the front hooded post sight and the adjustable for windage and elevation drum-type diopter rear sight. Special quick-detachable clamp mounts allows for installation of night, optical and red-dot sights if required. Standard magazine capacity is 30 rounds, but shorter 15 rounds magazines are available. Special versions were developed and manufactured in limited numbers during 1980s-90s for the US Law Enforcement market, chambered for more powerful 10mm Auto (10x25mm) and .40S&W (10x22mm) ammunition. These guns can be easily distinguished from more common 9mm models by straight box 30 rounds magazines, made from plastic.

While all of MP-5 can be fitted with silencers, there also a dedicated silenced version of MP-5, called MP5SD2 or SD3 (depending on the stock type). This version is equipped with non detachable integral silencer, and the vented barrel, to reduce the bullet muzzle velocity down below the speed of sound. The MP-5SD is intended to fire standard 9mm ammunition, not the special subsonic one.
Semi-automatic only versions of the MP-5 were once made for civilian market under the designation of HK-94, some with longer, 16 inch (406 mm) barrels, to conform with US laws. There also is an US company, called Special Weapons LLC, that is manufacturing semi-automatic, civilian MP-5 clones in various pistol calibers, including the .45ACP.

Friday, September 10, 2010

MP 3008 submachine gun




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MP 3008 submachine gun, version with skeletonized butt


MP 3008 submachine gun, version with tubular butt


Caliber 9x19mm Luger / Parabellum
Weight 2.95 kg empty
Length (stock closed/open) 794 mm
Barrel length 200 mm
Rate of fire 500 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity 32 rounds

MP 3008 submachine gun was developed and manufactured in Germany during final stages of the World War 2. It is also known as "Volks Machinenpistole" (People's submachine gun), as it was produced as a last-ditch weapon to arm German Volkssturm units. Several German factories produced about 10 000 of MP 3008 submachine guns in several minor variations, with different stocks. All modifications were internally similar, being based on the British Sten Mk.II submachine gun.

The MP 3008 submachine gun is a simple blowback operated weapon that fires from open bolt. It was capable of semi-automatic and full-automatic fire, thanks to the Sten-type cross-bolt button type fire mode selector. The safety was made in the form of the L-shaped cut at the rear of the cocking handle slot, which was used to lock the bolt in rearward position. Unlike the prototype (Sten Mk.II) the magazine housing on the MP 3008 was welded below the tubular receiver. Ammunition was fed from 32-round box magazines, compatible with German MP40 submachine guns. The sights consisted of the front post and rear aperture, with fixed setting for 100 meters range. The MP 3008 submachine guns were manufactured withs several types of buttstocks, including metallic skeletonized or tubular butts, or simple wooden butts.

Thursday, September 9, 2010

Erma EMP 35 submachine gun




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Erma EMP-35 submachine gun, left side view. Note flip-up rear sight and additional manual safety on the receiver



Erma EMP-35 submachine gun (variant with tangent sight), right side view; magazine removed

Caliber 9x19mm Luger / Parabellum
Weight 4,1 kg empty
Length 892 or 950 mm
Barrel length 250 or 308 mm
Rate of fire 450-500 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity 32 rounds
Effective range 150-200 meters

Heinrich Vollmer, an arms designer from Germany, designed his first submachine gun in 1925. His first weapon looked much like the Bergmann / Schmeisser MP-18/I, but with certain differences such as vertical foregrip and a small, drum-type magazine which was attached below the receiver and held 25 rounds of 9mm pistol ammunition. He gradually improved his weapon up until 1928 or 1929, when he made first commercial sales of the new submachine gun, which was offered in a variety of calibers, including 7,65x22 Luger, 7,63x25 Mauser, 9x19 Luger and 9x25 Mauser Export.

In 1930, Vollmer introduced an improved design, with side-feed using box magazines and patented telescoped return spring guide, later used in famous MP- 38 and MP-40 submachine guns. Since the Vollmer himself has not enough financial capabilities to produce this gun on commercial basis, in 1931 he sold the manufacturing rights to German Erfurter Maschinenfabrik company, usually known under its trade mark Erma.

Erma produced Vollmer design in a variety of models under one common name EMP (Erma Maschinen Pistole - Erma machine pistol). These weapons differed in length of the barrel, type of sights, safety arrangements and availability of accessories, but general layout and features were the same. EMP submachine guns were sold to France, Spain and several South American countries. Germans mostly issued Erma EMP submachine guns to police and Waffen SS troops.

Erma EMP submachine gun is blowback operated, selective-fired weapon which fires from open bolt. It uses characteristic bolt system with telescoped tubular guide for return spring. The standard safety consisted of a hook-shaped notch in the receiver, which was used to engage and lock the bolt in cocked position. Additionally, on some EMP weapons, a manual safety was installed on the left side of receiver, behind the magazine housing. The fire mode selector was located on the right side of the stock, above the trigger guard. The feed was from the left side, using double-row box magazines. The magazine housing was slightly canted forward to improve feeding. Ejection was to the right. The stock with semi-pistol grip was made from wood; standard versions had additional front grip under the stock, but Erma also produced version of EMP without this foregrip. Sights also varied - Erma produced EMP submachine guns with two-position flip-up or with tangent rear sights.

EMP also had one more unusual design feature - a disassembly catch that was located at the rear of the trigger guard. There was nothing wrong with it - until shooter hit it with his fingers during combat, which resulted in instant self-disassembly of the weapon - a very unwelcome event for any fighting soldier.

Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Haenel / Schmeisser MP-41 submachine gun




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Haenel / Schmeisser MP-41 submachine gun, right side


Haenel / Schmeisser MP-41 submachine gun, left side


Receiver markings of MP-41, showing characteristic "Patent Schmeisser" inscription


Caliber 9x19mm Luger / Parabellum
Weight 3,87 kg empty
Length 860 mm
Barrel length 250 mm
Rate of fire 500 rounds per minute
Magazine capacity 32 rounds
Effective range 150-200 meters

The MP-41 (M.P. 41) submachine gun was developed by Hugo Schmeisser, son of the Louis Schmeisser who developed the first practical machine gun, the MP-18. At the time of development of MP-41, that is, in 1941, the company C.G.Haenel, at which Schmeisser was chief designer, manufactured MP-40 submachine guns for German army. It is possible that Schmeisser decided to develop a submachine gun which was better suited for infantry use than the MP-40. For this reason, he combined the receiver, action and magazine of MP-40 with the wooden stock and selective-fire mechanism of MP-28. Haenel company produced more than few MP-41 submachine guns, which were mostly purchased by SS troops, which had their own supply chains. However, late in 1941 Erma company filed a patent infringement lawsuit against Haenel, and as a result, Haenel company was forced to close the production of MP-41. Only 26 700 guns of MP-41 pattern were made during the war, and most were issued to SS, SD and police troops.

The MP-41 (M.P. 41) submachine gun is blowback operated, selective-fire weapon which fires from open bolt. It uses bolt with telescoped return spring guide, borrowed from MP-40 along with receiver and magazine. The wooden stock and trigger unit with cross-bolt button fire mode selector were taken from MP-28.
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